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Swiss Japan Free Trade Agreement

By Mark, April 12, 2021

Types of accumulation: bilateral accumulation: only with primary subjects of the two free trade partners (bilateral) (for example. B Switzerland-Japan or AELE-COLOMBIA). Diagonal accumulation: possible with primary subjects of several free trade partners, as all apply the same country of origin rules (e.g.B. EU-EFTA-Turkey). Cumulative euro-med: this is also possible with primary materials from Mediterranean countries, since all the free trade partners concerned apply the same country of origin rules and there are agreements between them. Participating countries: Egypt, Algeria, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, as well as the Faroe Islands. Effective 1 January 2012, the countries of the Western Balkans were also admitted to the Euro-med cumulative zone: Albania, Croatia, Macedonia and Serbia. Cumulative with the EU is not yet possible and does not apply to agricultural products mentioned in Chapters 1 to 24. Pan-European accumulation: with primary materials from EFTA, the EU or Turkey. Full accumulation: the appropriate treatment must not take place on the customs territory of a single country, but can be carried out throughout the territory of a free trade agreement. Full accumulation is only provided for under the AELE-Tunisia free trade agreement. IiA Mapping Project The IIA Mapping Project is a cooperative initiative between UNCTAD and universities around the world to represent the content of II A. The resulting database serves as a tool to understand trends in CEW development, assess the prevalence of different policy approaches, and identify examples of contracts.

The Mapping of IIA Content allows you to browse the results of the project (the page will be regularly updated as new results become available). Please mention: UNCTAD, Mapping of IIA Content, available at investmentpolicy.unctad.org/international-investment-agreements/iia-mapping More information: Mapping Project Page Project Description – Methodology document The preferred origin is to make goods duty-free or to benefit from reduced duties when exported to a free trade country. This document is accompanied by a certificate of movement of goods or a declaration of country of origin on invoice. Compliance with non-preferential country of origin rules does not exempt goods from customs when imported into a third country – these country of origin rules only apply if the destination country requires a country of origin certificate for importation. This should not be confused with the issue of Swissness (“Made in Switzerland”), which is subject to another set of rules. Most Swiss agreements are concluded under the European Free Trade Association (EFTA). In addition, Switzerland also has the right to negotiate free trade agreements without efTA participation, as has been the case, for example, with China, Japan and the Faroe Islands. Bernd Hoch, Managing Director of MM Automobile Suisse AG: “The Japanese and the Swiss have a similar mentality that we both appreciate the ideals of trust, honesty, hard work and traditional values.